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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
in china. they have a voracious appetite for natural resources and we're looking at new ways to get these in our own backyard, and maybe i will ask you this question, admiral. admiral, maybe i will ask you this question. how important is the china factor in america energy program's going forward? >> i will talk to doubt, but i would like to mention a few puffs things about this report that may not have come out in your opening remarks. we definitely advocating opening of drilling in the united states where we cannot, but there is a -- wherever we can, but there is a very strong part of this report that says it has to be done safely and we know how to do it safely. that is one contribution of those of us who have served in the armed forces, we do a lot of dangerous stuff in the armed forces, fuel, nuclear power, explosives. the way we do that safely is a high standards, rigid enforcement, and very professional inspectors to do it. we strongly recommend applying this model to regulatory body so that we can do this safely, so that we can do oil retractions safely. that we can do safel
and a half percent per year, suddenly it started going up 3% a year as china and india really kicked in. other things being equal, if you change the rate of emission of co2 to the atmosphere, the so-called airborne fraction, the fraction of the co2 that appears in the atmosphere should increase, simply because that quick injection of co2 causes the ocean surface layers to be relatively saturated so it can't get in to the ocean as fast as it used to. but what's actually happened in the last 12 years is the airborne fraction has plummeted. it's now only about 40%. the other 60% is disappearing. and it's not mostly going in to the ocean. the good fraction of it is being taken up, somehow, by the terrestrial biosphere. of i think that's because the -- we were doubling -- i think we're doubling down on the faustian bargain because we're fertilizing the terrestrial biosphere, both with the co2 in the atmosphere and the combination of that with more nitrogen which will spread in part of -- the nitrogen is being spread around by these aerosols which china and india are putting out and its actua
also have an economic competitor and a partner in china. they have a voracious appetite for natural resources and we're looking at new ways to get these in our own backyard, and maybe i will ask you this question, admiral. how important is the china factor in america energy program's going forward? >> i will talk to doubt, but i would like to mention a few puffs things about this report that may not have come out in your opening remarks. we definitely advocating opening of drilling in the united states where we cannot, but there is a very strong part of this report that says it has to be done safely and we know how to do it safely. that is one contribution of those of us who have served in the armed forces, we do a lot of dangerous stuff in the armed forces, fuel, nuclear power, explosives. the way we do that safely is a high standards, rigid enforcement, and very professional inspectors to do it. we strongly recommend applying this model to regulatory body so that we can do this safely, so that we can do oil retractions safely. that we can do safely. the general and i live in penns
that that causes, particularly in an era where rising demand for petroleum in china and india and elsewhere is creating potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize that transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum where the prices are set on the world market. canada and norway have been net petroleum exporters, but they pay in those countries the same market price for a gallon of gasoline as we do. so you must diversify, and that includes electrification of short-haul transportation, light-duty trucks and vehicles, and the adoption of natural gas either in its lick if i quide or compressed forms for heavy-duty vehicles and over the road vehicles. but taken as a whole if the recommendations of the eslc are adopted, the united states has the potential to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum and thereby reduce our national security risk to improve our balance of payments and about half of our balance of payments deficit remains petroleum, and to increase our g.d.p. by the maximization of these activities in the united states rather than exporting our d
to pyongyang. press articles hail the fact that china in anticipation of the recent launch had begun inspecting cargo on north korean ships in search of contraband. the question this raises is why has chi gnat not been inspecting north korean ships since 2006 as called for in a u.n. resolution, reinforced by another resolution in 2009. if u.n. member states would only enforce the sanctions currently on the books, north korea would be unable to ignore the swer national community and the civilized world. the time for coordinated international action is now. the time, in fact, is long overdue. with that, mr. speakering i reserve the balance of our time. the speaker pro tempore: the squom from florida reserves. the gentleman from california, mr. berman is recognized. mr. berman: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of h.con.res. 145 as amended and yield myself such time as i may consume. sproy the gentleman is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threa
deficit to china being $29.8 billion per month. that is just one country. you start to add up all the trade deficit that we have with all of these different trading partners over the years, i am sure that it is close to about $1 trillion per year. >> thank you for the comments. let's go to sarasota next. caller: good afternoon. the way that i look at it, as a 74-year-old professional pharmacist with a minor in economics, the reason i am independent is because republicans and democrats cannot seem to get it together. the biggest problem that we have now is the reason why we cannot do what we are supposed to do for the entire country. one middleman adnan grover norquist. someone who was never even elected. here is a man that has caused all the problems. all of the republicans have signed this pledge, which to me is unconstitutional. without him, we would not be talking today. >> salem, oregon, republican line. you are on the air. caller: good morning. as a college student, and i have listened to every single caller, this is an embarrassing day for our country. i am a first-time job
by "the detroit news." he's told chrysler to italians were going to make jeeps in china. romney will fight for every american jobs. >> ibm @ rahm and i approve this message. host: that ad was quickly refuted by the obama campaign. this ad became a real distraction to the campaign in the following weeks. they will say if you looked at where the results were in ohio, where they lost was not in the automobile district but elsewhere. it created a stink over the romney campaign in the final days that hurt him everywhere. to us, this ad captures something important. it is their uneasiness about talking about issues that are not helpful for them earlier on but they had to be talked about. this saw the automobile issue was playing on obama's turf. they were talking about it so it was an issue out there. when you don't talk about it and don't explain it, that's a problem. there was a notion run the campaign, if you are explaining, you are a loser. the problem was by not explaining or even addressing, they let themselves be defined. they realize this late in the game. there was huge pressure from el
as china with the issue of human rights. as long as the international community does not address the interests of the importance stakeholders, that is not really going to help. what is your take on that? >> i think they have very short form policy. i have been in moscow and we met with the russian minister of foreign affairs. syria and russia have a relationship. we need to keep such a relationship, but with such short policies by defending the assad regime, you of making such a relationship very difficult. i think the syrians see russia the same as they see the assad regime. when you see your brother and sister being killed every day -- i have been in syria and i have lots of examples. when the syrian people solve all of this happen for them, of course, they will change their position on russia. i think for russia to keep their ambassador, it is difficult to keep him in damascus. any government in the future, they will put their relationship with russia and iran as a priority. there are many voices within the opposition, and the syrian government should be open to negotiations a
with this, the british, the french, the germans, russia, china, they all tend to view this as a proliferation problem. the conversation between iran and the other side tends to be about that issue, very narrowly focused. to kind of move that conversation, you have to figure out a different kind of architecture. the five plus one process, as such, is designed to deal with the corporation issue and the composition is that has to do with the iranian violation of the mpt and there have been 62 -- six security council resolutions that suggests sanctions. there are two countries who suggest that the issue between -- that this is not a proliferation issue but has to do with the character of the regime and one of them is israel who does not view this as strictly an arms dispute and the second one is iran who similarly suggests that although it is an arms control issue, they are really using arms control as a way to undermine the regime. there are two actors in this particular conflagration who are not accepting the argument being that this is about nuclear infractions as oppo
. as far as china is concerned, we don't tariff, we don't put that high of a tariff on their imports but yet i don't know the exact numbers but i believe it's a lot higher that they tax our imports in their country. and the whole thing with jobs. he created the apple scommuret in california in his garage but yet when he got successful he moves all his company over to china, giving chinese people jobs. if steve jobs was born in china he wouldn't even have a garage therefore he wouldn't be able to create the apple computer. so i just think we just don't do enough for the people of this country. and the people who are in position to create jobs and do this do not reinvest in the country. therefore i don't think they should get tax breaks. if you want to give these corporate giants tax breaks then give it to those who want to invest in the country, who want to create jobs here, not overcease, and they think try to think of ways to get their money over there into here lower than say the american businessman paying 35%. guest: i mean, i understand your frustration. i think part of it is th
union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther king and jesse jackson, etc., etc. the re
look at china in particular, they are looking for corporate bonds rather than u.s. treasury securities because they do not like what they see. we are living on borrowed time. we have created another bubble. my view is the reason the fed is doing that is because the mandate was changed in the late 70's to where they have to be concerned with unemployment. we need a fiscal deal. the fed is the onlythe fed has to change its policy unsustainable over time. >> right. >> one of the most successful physical consolidations in the developed, democratic world in canada, in the mid 1990's, and i ask the canadian politicians how did you do it? the public went from cheering on spending to deficits within a matter of a year or two. the government in canada now risks some peril if they do not balance their budget. the answer you most frequently get is all they had to do was say, 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill on the canadian debt, and the public immediately realized that was not a great idea. we cannot make that argument. we run these massive deficits and because interest rates ha
was union and we were making $16 an hour. it went overseas. the company would prefer to go to china and a somebody $2 a day or whatever. these right-to-work states are full of temporary jobs agencies with contracts. the stamp services -- these temporary services are making money and paying people a fraction. we need to let politicians go to a temporary service and give them half of what they are making and make them see how we feel. people working for small amounts of money at temp services. ynette.ow to panetta, conwalive caller: they call it a right-to- work states, but i guess the language got changed, because it used to be a free will state. the employers without unions had the right to fire you for anything, any reason or no reason at all, and you had no recourse. so i still believe in unions and i still believe the people should have a right to join or not. host: this tweet -- are you with us? caller: i am. host: higher wages of less jobs in the state's. caller: yes, but most of the jobs in this area, in the myrtle beach area, those are minimum- wage jobs, where i live. if we
he came from, back to china, but his home country, our good old buddies, the chinese, refused to take him back. they didn't want him, and so they stalled and stalled and stalled, and over those three years of chinese stalling and gave him the run-around, chen was eventually free and free to kill and kill he did. mr. speaker, this tragedy is not an isolated phenomena. flafflet, other americans have died as a result -- unfortunately, other americans have died as a result of a gaping hole in the immigration system. it's no secret that everybody believes our immigration system is broken. fixing it down the road will be complex and complicated, but there's some things we can do about immigration right now to fix specific problems and here's one of these. currently, mr. speaker, thousands of criminal aliens are in our country, just like chen, that have committed a crime, gone to prison, our immigration worked to order them deported but their country won't take them back. they refuse to do so, so those countries stall and delay and eventually never take back their outlaws. so by law when the
where we can solve the whole immigration problem. people say, how do we compete with china? we can have the entire world at our disposal and start businesses. then we have to focus on tax and the corporate tax reform to get a system that is simpler and makes it easier for businesses to compete in the world. that will be enormous. there is an infrastructure investment that needs to be made. this is important with the budget deal going forward. we have to think about what our values are. we can spend money on infrastructure to make investments in the future rather than having short-term spending. support for basic research and for higher education, as drew talked about. tell us what is and we can plan around it with respect to health care costs and energy costs. then it businesses can create a renaissance of american competitiveness. >> i think that is a brilliant agenda. i don't think that has changed. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, investments. you are not going to do a dream act. we had a chance to do it. george bush, john mccain. maybe the republicans learne
china is a big user. it is like any commodity. host: mr. sieminski, what are the major renewable energy source available to be developed in the eastern u.s., and how do we get them to get started? guest: the eastern united states energy resources, in the east coast of the u.s., we now have discovered there is a lot of natural gas. it basically starts in west virginia and runs up into pennsylvania and up into new york state. if we go back the last 100 years, pennsylvania and west virginia have been big producers of coal in the u.s. the oil industry started, the first well was drilled in pennsylvania back in 1859. the wind resources along the east coast, are being developed as well pro. probably the most exciting thing being developed in the east coast is a possibility there --uld b host: on the same question of what is out there, what is the u.s. energy independence status if all the offshore oil and anwar are included? guest: it goes to the answer that frank gave. all of the oil in the united states does not belong to the federal government. oil offshore generally falls under the federa
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)